Water, washing, sauna

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Water, washing, sauna

Author: Reilika Nestor 26.12.2014 at 00:00

Water is a great resource of health. Washing is one of our daily self-evident activities, but we should use water for more than merely showering. At least once a day, if not more often, we should wash ourselves all over. This is especially enjoyable after a light morning exercise. People with sensitive skin and poor blood should take hot showers. Let water pour all over your body while you massage it gently. This is good for your blood circulation and digestion. It would be good to lie down after a sauna session or bath for an hour or so and just rest.

Warm baths are always welcome to nourish your body and mind. A couple of 10 to 30 minute baths per week calms nervous people. A warm foot bath can also be very effective in warming your entire body. This is an important thing to remember, as many illnesses begin from cold feet. After a warm foot bath, it’s beneficial to soak both feet in cold water for a moment to protect them from becoming too tender.

Saunas and baths are always more useful when you massage yourself with your hands or a brush. It would be even better if you have a companion massage yourself. To keep your body in tone and resistant, it’s wise to soak yourself with water as cold as possible when in the sauna or, if possible, dip yourself in an ice hole. Cold water invigorates your entire organism and accelerates metabolism.

Swimming in the sea is also good for you thanks to the salt in seawater. An alternative is a warm sauna followed by rubbing your body with salt. Salt should be massaged on hot skin, then rubbed strongly, and flushed off with lukewarm water. After this, head to cold water or under a cold shower. The shorter the time spent in cold water, the stronger the invigorating effect. Staying too long will cool your body too much. 10 to 15 seconds is more than enough. Short cold showers are often a good remedy for illness and a fine prophylactic.

Walking barefoot on grass covered with morning dew in the summer and soaking your feet in a slightly colder bath can prevent overstressing your head and chest, since the temperature drop directs blood to the body part most affected by cold – the feet in this context. Massaging with a towel soaked in cold water is also a good home solution for directing blood flow in your body.

After 20 minutes of warm baths, always take a colder one to follow. If possible, it would be even better to alternate hot and cold baths. We can call this internal exercise for our organism, which results in a strong inflow of blood.