Contraceptives – pros and cons

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Contraceptives – pros and cons

Author: Reilika Nestor 21.12.2014 at 00:00

American nurse Margaret Sanger spent her entire life fighting for birth control and conducted a study that lead to the development of the world’s first contraceptive pill. It has been named as one of the most significant medical achievements of the 20th century. In 1962-69, the number of its users grew from around 50 000 women to one million.

Throughout history, women have used different contraceptives that are often insufficient and, at times, even dangerous. Today, we have enough options to find birth control that suits us best. Below we’ve listed short descriptions of various methods of birth control and brought out their pros and cons as experienced by women.

Unprotected sexual intercourse:

15% probability of avoiding pregnancy.
Many women avoid using protection by calculating from their menstrual cycle. They consider having sex within ten days from the end of their period safe and use birth control after that.

Avoiding sex:
100% probability of avoiding pregnancy.
Avoiding sexual interaction causes tension in both men and women. Since sex has a positive impact on our mental and physical well-being, it cannot be recommended to avoid having a love life, but ultimately, this remains everyone’s personal choice.

“Pulling out”:

81-96% probability of avoiding pregnancy.
Men have stated that ending intercourse immediately before ejaculation is very uncomfortable for them, since it leaves a feeling of unfinished business. Women think men should pull out when the woman climaxes.

Sex games, without penetration:
Near 100% probability of avoiding pregnancy.
Both men and women rarely find it exciting. Why have genitals if you can’t use them?
Male condom: (read more from “The History of Condoms”)
86% probability of avoiding pregnancy, 98% probability if used correctly.
Men and women agree here: both feel comfortable and safe using a condom.

Female condom:

79% probability of avoiding pregnancy, up to 95% probability if used correctly.
Both sexes consider female condoms uncomfortable, which is why their not very popular.

Diaphragm with spermicide:

80% probability of avoiding pregnancy, up to 94% probability if used correctly.

Pessary with spermicide:

60-80% probability of avoiding pregnancy, up to 90% probability if used correctly by women who haven’t given birth.

Sponge with spermicide:

60-80% probability of avoiding pregnancy.

Spermicide:

74% probability of avoiding pregnancy, up to 94% probability if used correctly.

Combined pills:
95% probability of avoiding pregnancy, up to 99.9% probability if used correctly.

Progestin pills:
95% probability of avoiding pregnancy.

Morning-after pills:

75% probability of avoiding pregnancy, up to 89% probability if used correctly.

Injection (Depo-Provera):
Up to 99.7% probability of avoiding pregnancy if used correctly.

Implant (Norplant):
Up to 99.99% probability of avoiding pregnancy if used correctly.

Intrauterine device (spiral):
98-99% probability of avoiding pregnancy.

Temporary abstinence:

About 75% probability of avoiding pregnancy (depending on method), up to 99% if used correctly.

Surgical sterilization:

99.5-99.99% probability of avoiding pregnancy if used correctly.

What do you use?


Unprotected intercourse:
Avoiding sex:
“Pulling out”:
Male condom:
Female condom:
Diaphragm with spermicide:
Pessary with spermicide:
Sponge with spermicide:
Spermicide:
Combined pills:
Progestin pills:
Morning-after pills:
Injection (Depo-Provera):
Implant (Norplant):
Intrauterine device (spiral):
Temporary abstinence:
Surgical sterilization:

Leave a comment on your experiences!